Web presence step by step Chapter 15: Using dwservice.net to provide remote technical support as an alternative to TeamViewer

Previous step: Chapter 14: Installing and configuring Live Helper Chat to add text chat support to a website
Next step: Chapter 16: Using a script to automate the creation of a virtual host on an Apache web server

Web presence step by step is a series of posts that show you to how to build a web presence.

In this chapter we install and configure dwservice.net to provide remote technical support as an alternative to TeamViewer.

dwservice.net allows a client to share their computer’s desktop so you can provide technical support

When you build and maintain technical systems, you need to support the clients of those systems, including customers, colleagues, and contractors. dwservice.net allows you to invite a client to share their computer’s desktop so you can provide technical support.

Creating an account on the dwservice.net service

Visit the dwservice.net site:

https://dwservice.net

Create a username and password for the dwservice.net site. You will need it later in this procedure.

dwservice.net provides client software for the Windows, MacOS, and Linux operating systems

This chapter contains sections describing how to install the dwservice.net client for Windows, MacOS, and Linux.

Windows

Visiting the website to download the installer on a Windows workstation

Visit the dwservice.net site:

https://dwservice.net

Click on “Download”:

Click on “Download”:

Right-click on the file name, click “Show in folder”:

Using the dwservice.net client on a Windows workstation in run-once mode

Double-click on the file to run the dwagent.exe setup program:

Select “Run,” click on “Next”:

View on the Windows workstation:

Accessing the Windows workstation from the dwservice.net site

Visit the dwservice.net site:

https://dwservice.net

Enter the username and password displayed on the Windows workstation running the dwservice.net client, click on “Sign in”:

Resources available on the Windows workstation

This page shows the resources available on the Windows workstation:

Screen (remote desktop)

Remote control of the desktop of the Windows workstation:

Files and Folders

Access to the filesystem on the Windows workstation:

Shell

Access to the operating system shell prompt on the Windows workstation:

Installing the dwservice.net client on a Windows workstation to enable unattended access

Right-click on the “dwagent.exe” file. Select “Run as administrator”:

Select “Install,” click on “Next”:

Select “Yes,” click on “Next”:

Select “Creating a new agent, click on “Next”:

Enter the username and password of a valid dwservice.net account in the “DWS user” and DWS password” fields. Enter a name to describe the workstation in the “Agent name” field. Click on “Next”:

Click on “Close”:

Visit the dwservice.net site:

https://dwservice.net

Enter the username and password of a valid dwservice.net account in the “DWS user” and DWS password” fields. Click on “Sign in”:

Click on “Agents”:

Click on the icon for the Windows workstation:

Resources available on the Windows workstation

This page shows the resources available on the Windows workstation:

Screen (remote desktop)

Remote control of the desktop of the Windows workstation:

Files and Folders

Access to the filesystem on the Windows workstation:

Shell

Access to the operating system shell prompt on the Windows workstation:

MacOS

Visiting the website to download the installer on a MacOS workstation

Visit the dwservice.net site:

https://dwservice.net

Click on “Download”:

Click on “Download”:

Click on “Allow”:

Locate the downloaded file, click on it:

This error message appears. Click on “OK”:

On the MacOS workstation, launch “System Preferences.” Click on “Security & Privacy”:

Click on “Open Anyway”:

Click on “Open”:

The dwservice.net package opens:

Click on “DWAgent”:

Click on “Run”:

View on the MacOS workstation:

Accessing the MacOS workstation from the dwservice.net site

Visit the dwservice.net site:

https://dwservice.net

Enter the username and password displayed on the MacOS workstation running the dwservice.net client, click on “Sign in”:

The following message appears on the MacOS workstation. Click on “Open System Preferences”:

Click on “Quit Now”:

On the MacOS workstation, restart the dwservice.net client.

Accessing the MacOS workstation from the dwservice.net site (again)

Visit the dwservice.net site:

https://dwservice.net

Enter the username and password displayed on the MacOS workstation running the dwservice.net client, click on “Sign in”:

Resources available on the MacOS workstation

This page shows the resources available on the MacOS workstation:

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screenshot-from-2021-05-01-06-49-07-1024x725.png

Screen (remote desktop)

Remote control of the desktop of the MacOS workstation:

Files and Folders

Access to the filesystem on the MacOS workstation:

Shell

Access to the operating system shell prompt on the MacOS workstation:

Installing the dwservice.net client on a MacOS workstation to enable unattended access

Click on “Open”:

Select “Install,” click on “Next”:

enter the “User Name” and “Password” for the MacOS workstation, click on “OK”:

Click on “Next”:

Select “Yes,” click on “Next”:

Select “Creating a new agent,” click on “Next”:

Enter the username and password of a valid dwservice.net account in the “DWS user” and DWS password” fields. Enter a name to describe the workstation in the “Agent name” field. Click on “Next”:

Click on “Close”:

View of the DWAgent Monitor on MacOS:

Click on “OK”:

Visit the dwservice.net site:

https://dwservice.net

Enter the username and password of a valid dwservice.net account in the “DWS user” and DWS password” fields. Click on “Sign in”:

Click on “Agents”:

Click on the icon for the MacOS workstation:

Resources available on the MacOS workstation

This page shows the resources available on the MacOS workstation. Click on “Screen”:

Allowing the dwaggui program to record the computer’s screen (needed for Screen/remote desktop access)

Click on “Open System Preferences”:

Allow the dwgguilnc program to record the screen:

Screen (remote desktop)

Remote control of the desktop of the MacOS workstation:

Files and Folders

Access to the filesystem on the MacOS workstation:

Shell

Access to the operating system shell prompt on the MacOS workstation:

Linux

Ensuring that Wayland is disabled

dwservice.net is not compatible with the Wayland display server.

from a root operating system prompt (use “sudo su” if you are not yet logged in as root), enter these commands:

cd /etc/gdm3
nano custom.conf

(Note: the directory location varies by distribution. For the Fedora distribution, specify the directory “etc/gdm”).

Remove the # comment before “WaylandEnable=false”:

Save and exit the file:

If you had to remove the “#” sign before “WaylandEnable=false” then reboot the Linux workstation so the change can take effect.

Visiting the website to download the installer on a Linux workstation

Visit the dwservice.net site:

https://dwservice.net

Click on “Download”:

Using the dwservice.net client on a Linux workstation in run-once mode

Open a terminal window on the Linux desktop. Change to the folder where the file was downloaded. Enter this command:

bash dwagent.sh

Select “Run,” click on “Next”:

View on the Linux Workstation:

Accessing the Linux workstation from the dwservice.net site

Visit the dwservice.net site:

https://dwservice.net

Enter the username and password displayed on the Linux workstation running the dwservice.net client, click on “Sign in”:

Resources available on the Linux workstation

This page shows the resources available on the Linux workstation:

Screen (remote desktop)

Remote control of the desktop of the Linux workstation:

Files and Folders

Access to the filesystem on the Linux workstation:

Shell

Access to the operating system shell prompt on the Linux workstation:

Installing the dwservice.net client on a Linux workstation to enable unattended access

Open a terminal window on the Linux desktop. Change to the folder where the file was downloaded.

Use “sudo su” to become root if you have not already done so. enter these commands:

Enter this command:

bash dwagent.sh 

Select “Install,” click on “Next”:

Click on “Next”:

Select “Yes,” click on “Next”:

Enter the username and password of a valid dwservice.net account in the “DWS user” and DWS password” fields. Enter a name to describe the workstation in the “Agent name” field. Click on “Next”:

Click on “Close”:

Visit the dwservice.net site:

https://dwservice.net

Enter the username and password of a valid dwservice.net account in the “DWS user” and DWS password” fields. Click on “Sign in”:

Click on “Agents”:

Click on the icon for the Linux workstation:

Resources available on the Linux workstation

This page shows the resources available on the Linux workstation:

Screen (remote desktop)

Remote control of the desktop of the Linux workstation:

Files and Folders

Access to the filesystem on the Linux workstation:

Shell

Access to the operating system shell prompt on the Linux workstation:

Previous step: Chapter 14: Installing and configuring Live Helper Chat to add text chat support to a website
Next step: Chapter 16: Using a script to automate the creation of a virtual host on an Apache web server

Web presence step by step Chapter 14: Installing and configuring Live Helper Chat to add text chat support to a website

Previous step: Chapter 13: Installing and configuring MyBB to create a community forum site
Next step: Chapter 15: Using dwservice.net to provide remote technical support as an alternative to TeamViewer

Web presence step by step is a series of posts that show you to how to build a web presence.

In this chapter we install and configure Live Helper Chat to add text chat support to a website.

Installing the php-curl and php-bcmath extensions, enabling the Apache headers module, and restarting the Apache web server

Live Helper Chat requires the php-curl library, the php-bcmath library, and the headers Apache module.

Use an SSH terminal program to connect to the Ubuntu Linux cloud server you created in Chapter 3: Buying an Ubuntu Linux cloud server from Digital Ocean.

Enter these commands:

apt install php-curl php-bcmath
a2enmod headers
apachectl restart

Creating the MySQL database that will store data for the Live Helper Chat software

Enter this command:

mysql -u root -P

In the MySQL console, enter these commands (where ‘xxxxxx’ is your password):

create user lhc01@localhost;
set password for lhc01@localhost = 'xxxxxx';
create database lhc01;
use lhc01;
grant all privileges on * to lhc01@localhost;
quit

Downloading the zip file containing the Live Helper Chat software

Visit this site:

https://livehelperchat.com

Click on “Download”:

Click on on the link below “Github – recommended link”:

The file downloads:

Extracting the contents of the zip file

If you need detailed instructions on how to uncompress zip files or rename directories on Windows, MacOS, or Linux

This chapter assumes that you have followed the steps in Chapter 8: Installing and configuring WordPress to create a website, and Chapter 9: Installing and configuring phpMyAdmin to manage MySQL databases. If you have not read those chapters, and you are not familiar with how to uncompress a zip file or rename a directory using your operating system, please consult those chapters.

Uncompressing the livehelperchat-master.zip file

We need to uncompress the livehelperchat-master.zip file:

Viewing the extracted folders and files

We can see the lhc_web directory:

Using FileZilla to upload the lhc_web directory to the directory containing the documents for your website

We will use the FileZilla file transfer program to upload the directory “lhc_web” to the directory containing the documents for your website.

If you need detailed instructions on how to install and use FileZilla on Windows, MacOS, or Linux

This chapter assumes that you have read Chapter 7: Configuring the SSH server on an Ubuntu Linux cloud server to limit SFTP directory visibility within chroot jail directories, or that you are familiar with the FileZilla file transfer program.

Using Filezilla, connect to the Ubuntu Linux cloud server you created in Chapter 3: Buying an Ubuntu Linux cloud server from Digital Ocean. On the right (remote) side, select the directory that contains the documents for your website. On the left (local) side, select the directory that contains the “lhc_web” directory. Right-click or command-click on the directory, select Upload:

The transfer completes:

Installing the Live Helper Chat software using the Live Helper Chat installation wizard

For our example domain, we will visit:

https://linuxstepbystep.com/lhc_web/index.php/site_admin/install/install

(substitute your domain name)

Click “Next”:

Complete the fields as shown. Click “Next”:

Complete the field as shown below. Click “Finish installation”:

Click “Login here”:

Generating the Live Helper Chat JavaScript text to add to an HTML header

(Note: for our example domain, we can visit this site at https://linuxstepbyste.com/lhc_web/index.php/site_admin)

Enter your username and password. Click “Login”:

Click on “Settings”:

Under “Mobile,” click on “Settings”:

Select the checkbox “Enable notifications,” click on “Save”:

Click on “Settings”:

Click on “Embed code”:

Click on “Widget embed code (new):

Complete the fields and select the options as required for your site. Copy the code from the text area to the page where you would like the web chat window to appear:

Embedding Live Helper Chat in a WordPress site

To embed the Live Helper Chat application in a WordPress site, we must first install the Insert Headers and Footers plugin for WordPress.

Installing the Insert Headers and Footers WordPress plugin

In your WordPress control panel, click on “Plugins,” then click on “Add New”:

In the search window, enter the text “insert headers and footers,” locate the plugin “Insert Headers and Footers,” click on “Install Now”:

Click on “Activate”:

Click on “Settings,” then click on “Insert Headers and Footers”:

Adding the JavaScript code using the Insert Headers and Footers WordPress plugin

Complete the fields as shown.

Scroll to the bottom of the page. Paste the JavaScript code you generated earlier in the section “Generating the Live Help Chat JavaScript text to add to an HTML header” to the field “Scripts in Footer,” click “Save”:

Cick on “Visit Site”:

The chat window is visible on the WordPress site:

Texting between the site’s visitors and the site’s operators:

Embedding Live Helper Chat in a simple web page

We can add the Live Helper Chat text chat window to a simple web page.

Using an SSH terminal program, connect to your Ubuntu Linux cloud server. Change to the directory containing the documents for your website. Enter the command:

nano test.html

Paste the JavaScript code you generated in the section “Generating the Live Help Chat JavaScript text to add to an HTML header,” press Control-X to save and exit the file:

Enter these commands (where username is the username that owns the documents for the website):

chown username:username test.html
chmod 755 test.html

View the test.html page in a web browser:

Accessing the Live Helper Chat operator panel

For our example domain, we can visit this site at https://linuxstepbyste.com/lhc_web/index.php/site_admin (Substitute your domain name.)

Enter your username and password. Click “Login”:

Click on “Chat”:

Configuring and Using the Android client

Download the “Live Helper Chat” app from the Google Play Store. When you launch the application, you will see this screen. Click on “+”:

Complete the fields below as shown (substitute your domain name). Click “Login”:

Configuring and using the iOS client

Download the “Live Helper Chat” app from the Apple App Store. When you launch the application, you will see this screen. Click on “Allow”:

Click on “+”:

Complete the fields as shown (substitute your domain name). Click “Login”:

Previous step: Chapter 13: Installing and configuring MyBB to create a community forum site
Next step: Chapter 15: Using dwservice.net to provide remote technical support as an alternative to TeamViewer

Web presence step by step Chapter 13: Installing and configuring MyBB to create a community forum site

Previous step: Chapter 12: Installing and configuring the WooCommerce plugin for WordPress to enable a shopping cart for transactions
Next step: Chapter 14: Installing and configuring Live Helper Chat to add text chat support to a website

Web presence step by step is a series of posts that show you to how to build a web presence.

In this chapter, we install and configure MyBB to create a community forum site.

If you are not familiar with SSH terminal programs

This chapter assumes that you have read Chapter 4: Using an SSH terminal program to connect to an Ubuntu Linux cloud server. If you are not familiar with SSH terminal programs, please consult that chapter.

Creating a MySQL database to host the data for the MyBB community forum site

Use an SSH terminal program to connect to the Ubuntu Linux cloud server you created in Chapter 3: Buying an Ubuntu Linux cloud server from Digital Ocean.

From the system prompt, enter the command:

mysql -u root -p

From the MySQL console prompt, enter these commands (use a unique password in place of ‘xxxxxx’):

create user bb01@localhost;
set password for bb01@localhost = 'xxxxxx';
create database bb01;
use bb01;
quit

Installing the php-gd extension

In order to generate graphics representing captchas, we need to install the php-gd extension.

Enter the command:

apt install php-gd

Enter the command:

systemctl restart apache2

Configuring a Gmail account to allow MyBB to send email messages

We need to select or create a Gmail account that the MyBB community forum software will use to send email messages. This can be the same Gmail account you selected or created in Chapter 11: Installing and configuring the WP Mail SMTP plugin for WordPress to enable WordPress to send email messages.

Click on the settings icon (gear symbol in upper-right):

Click on “See all settings”:

Click on “Accounts and Import”:

Click on “Other Google Account settings”:

Click on “Security”:

In the section “Less secure app access,” click on “Turn on access (not recommended)”:

Enable the control so that the page displays “Allow less secure apps: ON”:

Click on “Forwarding and POP/IMAP,” select the option “Enable IMAP,” click on “Save Changes”:

Downloading the MyBB zip file

Visit this site:

https://mybb.com/download/

Click on “Download MyBB x.x.xx” (where x.x.xx is the version):

The file downloads:

If you are using Chrome, right-click or command-click on the name of the file, select “Show in folder”:

Uncompressing the MyBB zip file and renaming the Upload directory

If you need detailed instructions on how to uncompress zip files or rename directories on Windows, MacOS, or Linux

This chapter assumes that you have followed the steps in Chapter 8: Installing and configuring WordPress to create a website, and Chapter 9: Installing and configuring phpMyAdmin to manage MySQL databases. If you have not read those chapters, and you are not familiar with how to uncompress a zip file or rename a directory using your operating system, please consult those chapters.

Uncompressing the mybb_xxxx.zip file

We need to uncompress the mybb_xxxx.zip file:

Uncompressing the zip file extracts 2 directories: “Documentation,” and “Upload”:

Renaming the directory named “Upload” to “community”

Rename the “Upload” directory to “community”:

Using FileZilla to upload the community directory to the directory containing the documents for your website

We will use the FileZilla file transfer program to upload the directory renamed as “community” to the directory containing the documents for your website.

If you need detailed instructions on how to install and use FileZilla on Windows, MacOS, or Linux

This chapter assumes that you have read Chapter 7: Configuring the SSH server on an Ubuntu Linux cloud server to limit SFTP directory visibility within chroot jail directories, or that you are familiar with the FileZilla file transfer program.

Using Filezilla, connect to the Ubuntu Linux cloud server you created in Chapter 3: Buying an Ubuntu Linux cloud server from Digital Ocean. On the right (remote) side, select the directory that contains the documents for your website. On the left (local) side, select the directory that contains the “community” directory. Right-click or command-click on the directory, select Upload:

The transfer completes:

Installing the MyBB software using the MyBB installation wizard

For our example domain, we will visit:

https://linuxstepbystep.com/community

(substitute your domain name)

Click “Next”:

Click “Next”:

Click “Next”:

Complete the fields as show below. Click “Next”:

Scroll to the bottom of the web page. Click “Next”:

Click “Next”:

Click “Next”:

Complete the fields as show below. Click “Next”:

Complete the fields as show below. Click “Next”:

This screen will display when we have finished:

Visiting the community forum site

For our example domain, we will visit:

https://linuxstepbystep.com/community

(substitute your domain name)

Logging into the admin account

Enter the username and password for the admin user. Click “Login”:

Click on “Admin CP”:

Enter the username and password for the admin user. Enter the secret PIN. Click “Login”:

Configuring the MyBB community forum site

Click on “Configuration”:

Scroll towards the bottom of the web page:

Click on “Mail Settings”:

Configure settings for “Mail handler”

Mail handler: select "SMTP mail"
SMTP hostname: smtp.gmail.com
SMTP port: 587
SMTP username: the address of the gmail account you selected or created earlier in this procedure
SMTP Encryption Mode: select "TLS encryption"

Click “Save Settings”:

Click on “Login and Registration Options”:

For “Registration Method,” select “Send Email Verification”:

Scroll to the bottom of the web page. Click on “Save Settings”:

Registering as a new user on the community forum site

Use a web browser to visit the community forum site. Click on “Register.” On the page titled “Registration Agreement,” consider then if you decide click “I agree”:

Complete the fields as show in the example below. Click “Submit Registration!”:

MyBB displays this message:

Check the email account you provided during registration. View the message sent by MyBB community forum site:

To activate your account, click on the link in the email:

Welcome as a member:

We will create a post. Click on “My Forum”:

Click on “Post Thread”:

In the field “Thread Subject:” enter a subject.

In the field “Your Message:” enter the text of a message.

Click on “Post Thread”:

The message is displayed. Click on “My Category”:

We now have 1 thread and 1 post:

Previous step: Chapter 12: Installing and configuring the WooCommerce plugin for WordPress to enable a shopping cart for transactions
Next step: Chapter 14: Installing and configuring Live Helper Chat to add text chat support to a website

Forwarding ports to a KVM guest using iptables and Network Address Translation (NAT)

This post describes how to create a BASH script that opens the KVM virtual network adapter to outside traffic, and forwards ports from the KVM host to the KVM guest using iptables and Network Address Translation (NAT).

The KVM virtual network adapter rejects packets from the outside world by default

By default, the virtual network adapter for KVM (virbr0) is configured to block network traffic originating from outside the host computer. This can be resolved with iptables directives, which will be described below.

You do not need to use /etc/ufw/before.rules or /etc/libvirt/hooks/qemu to forward ports to a KVM guest

Many Internet articles and posts on this subject give the incorrect impression that the only way to forward ports to a KVM guest is via UFW and its /etc/ufw/before.rules file, and/or that you need to create a post-configuration script as a qemu “hook” in the /etc/libvirt/hooks/qemu file. You can open the virtual network adapter to outside traffic and forward ports to the KVM guest under NAT solely using iptables directives.

An example of a BASH script that opens the virtual adapter to outside traffic, and forwards ports from the host to the guest

To illustrate the solution, here is a sample BASH script that contains iptables directives that open the virtual adapter to outside traffic, and forwards ports 80/tcp, 443/tcp, and 8022/tcp from the host to the guest:

#!/usr/bin/bash
# generated 2021/04/07 20:37:46 EDT by forwardportstoguestgenerator.php v0102
# Gordon Buchan https://gordonbuchan.com

# values
kvmsubnet="192.168.122.0/24"
wanadaptername="enx4ce1734b693e"
wanadapterip="192.168.46.123"
kvmadaptername="virbr0"
kvmadapterip="192.168.122.174"

# allow virtual adapter to accept packets from outside the host
iptables -I FORWARD -i $wanadaptername -o $kvmadaptername -d $kvmsubnet -j ACCEPT
iptables -I FORWARD -i $kvmadapterip -o $wanadaptername -s $kvmsubnet -j ACCEPT
# forward ports from host to guest
iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -i $wanadaptername -d $wanadapterip -p tcp --dport 80 -j  DNAT --to-destination $kvmadapterip:80
iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -i $wanadaptername -d $wanadapterip -p tcp --dport 443 -j DNAT --to-destination $kvmadapterip:443
iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -i $wanadaptername -d $wanadapterip -p tcp --dport 8022 -j DNAT --to-destination $kvmadapterip:22

A PHP script that generates a BASH script that opens the virtual network adapter to outside traffic, and forwards ports from the host to the guest

This script runs the ifconfig and virsh commands to compile lists of possible WAN interfaces and KVM guests. This script prompts for choices at console, and generates a text file containing a BASH script with iptables directives that open the virtual adapter to outside traffic, and forward ports from the host to the guest using network address translation (NAT).

#!/usr/bin/php
<?PHP
// forwardportstoguestgenerator.php
// v0102
// scan ifconfig and virsh, create iptables directives to forward ports to kvm guests
// chmod this script 755 to run as ./forwardportstoguestgenerator.php or run with php forwardportstoguestgenerator.php
// writes to a text file the BASH script forwardportstoguestscript.sh
 
// 2021/04/07
// Gordon Buchan https://gordonbuchan.com
// MIT license https://mit-license.org
 
// overview
// run the command "ifconfig" to isolate potential wan adapter names and ip addresses
// infer the KVM subnet based on the first 3 sections of the ip address of the "virbr0" adapter
// run the command "virsh net-dhcp-leases default" to isolate potential kvm guest names and ip addresses
// ask client to choose WAN adapter
// ask client to choose KVM guest
// create a batch file containing iptables directives to open the virtual adapter to packets from outside the host
// and to forward ports from the host adapter to the KVM guest adapter 80/tcp, and 443/tcp, 8022/tcp
 
// //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// start function sink
 
// str_contains() polyfill for pre PHP8
if (!function_exists('str_contains')) {
    function str_contains(string $haystack, string $needle): bool
    {
        return '' === $needle || false !== strpos($haystack, $needle);
    }
}
 
// end function sink
// //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 
// start get the WAN adapter names and ip addresses
 
// capture output of ifconfig command to variable $ifcstr
$ifcstr = `ifconfig`;
 
// convert string $ifcstr to array of lines $ifcstrarr
// use linefeed as field delimiter in array population
$ifcstrarr = explode("\n",$ifcstr);
 
// count lines in the array
$ifcstrarrnumlines = count($ifcstrarr);
 
$adnamestrarr = array();
$adipstrarr = array();
 
$kvmsubnet = "";
 
// iterate through array of lines
for ( $i=0;$i<$ifcstrarrnumlines;$i++) {
 
    if ( str_contains($ifcstrarr[$i],"flags")) {
        $flagsstr = "flags";
        $flagsstrloc = strpos("$ifcstrarr[$i]", $flagsstr) - 2;
        $adnamestr = substr($ifcstrarr[$i],0,$flagsstrloc);
    } // close if str contains "flags"
 
    // we will eventually filter virbr0, but for now we can find out the subnet for the KVM guest network
 
    if ( str_contains($ifcstrarr[$i],"inet") && !str_contains($ifcstrarr[$i],"inet6") ) {
 
        $inetstr = "inet";
        $inetstrloc = strpos("$ifcstrarr[$i]",$inetstr) + 5;
        $adipstr = substr($ifcstrarr[$i],$inetstrloc,"20");
        $spacestrloc = strpos("$adipstr"," ");
        // trimming the variable
        $adipstr = substr($adipstr,0,$spacestrloc);
 
        if (str_contains($adnamestr,"virbr0")) {
            // start infer KVM subnet
            // //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
            // do stuff here to get the virbr0 ip address so we can infer subnet
            $kvmsubnetraw = $adipstr;
            $lastdotloc = strrpos($kvmsubnetraw,".");
            $kvmsubnet = substr($kvmsubnetraw,0,$lastdotloc) . ".0/24";
            echo "\nKVM subnet\nkvmsubnet: $kvmsubnet\n\n";
            // end infer KVM subnet
            // //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
        } else {
            // stuff the arrays they will match by number because done at same time
            // filter for loopback device
            if (!($adipstr == "127.0.0.1")) {
                $adnamestrarr[] = $adnamestr;
                $adipstrarr[] = $adipstr;
            }
        }
 
    } // close if str contains "inet"
 
} // end for $i
 
//so we are always defined
$adnamestrarrnumlines = "";
$adnamestrarrnumlines = count ($adnamestrarr);
if (!$adnamestrarrnumlines) {
    echo "no WAN adapters found.\nStopping.\n";
    exit();
}

// if we do not have a KVM subnet, then something is wrong. Stop.
if (!$kvmsubnet) {
    echo "KVM subnet not detected. Stopping.\n";
    exit();
}
 
// end get the WAN adapter names and ip addresses
// //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 
// start get the KVM guest names and ip addresses
 
// capture output of virsh command to variable $ifcstr
$virshleastr = `virsh net-dhcp-leases default`;
 
// convert string $virshleastr to array of lines $virshleastrarr
// use linefeed as field delimiter in array population
$virshleastrarr = explode("\n",$virshleastr);
 
// count lines in the array
$virshleastrarrnumlines = count($virshleastrarr);
 
$kvmnamestrarr = array();
$kvmipstrarr = array();
 
// iterate through array of lines
for ( $j=0;$j<$virshleastrarrnumlines;$j++) {
    if ( str_contains($virshleastrarr[$j],"ipv4")) {
        $ipv4str = "ipv4";
        $ipv4strloc = strpos("$virshleastrarr[$j]", $ipv4str) + 11;
        $kvmlinestr = substr($virshleastrarr[$j],$ipv4strloc,50);
        $slashstr = "/";
        $slashstrloc = strpos("$kvmlinestr",$slashstr);
        $kvmipstr = substr($kvmlinestr,0,$slashstrloc);
        $kvmnamestr = substr($kvmlinestr,$slashstrloc+5,12);
        $kvmnamestr = trim($kvmnamestr);
        //stuff the arrays they will match by number because done at same time
        $kvmnamestrarr[] = $kvmnamestr;
        $kvmipstrarr[] = $kvmipstr;
    } // close if str contains "ipv4"
} // end for $j
 
$kvmnumlines = count ($kvmnamestrarr);
if (!$kvmnumlines) {
    echo "no VM guest DHCP leases found. Please start a VM.\nStopping.\n";
    exit();
}

// end get the KVM guest names and ip addresses
// //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 
// start ask client to choose WAN adapter
 
// show the possible WAN adapters as a numbered list to console:
echo "WAN adapters\n";
for ($k=0;$k<$adnamestrarrnumlines;$k++) {
    $displaynum = $k + 1;
    echo "$displaynum. $adnamestrarr[$k] $adipstrarr[$k]\n";
}
 
echo "\n";
 
// use readline function to ask questions interactively
// trap function in a while condition for sanity checking on input until satisfied
$wananswer = "";
while (!$wananswer || ($wananswer>$displaynum) || !is_numeric($wananswer) ) {
    $wananswer = readline("Please choose a WAN adapter (1-$displaynum): ");
}
 
echo "choice entered: $wananswer\n";
 
// because humans start at 1 and computers start at 0
$wanchoiceminus = $wananswer - 1;
 
$wanadaptername = $adnamestrarr[$wanchoiceminus];
$wanadapterip = $adipstrarr[$wanchoiceminus];
 
echo "\n";
echo "wanadaptername: $wanadaptername\n";
echo "wanadapterip: $wanadapterip\n";
echo "\n";
 
// end ask client to choose WAN adapter
// //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 
// start ask client to choose KVM guest
 
// show the possible KVM guests as a numbered list to console:
echo "KVM guests\n";
echo "(hint: if a VM is not listed here, start the VM so it gets a DHCP lease)\n";
for ($m=0;$m<$kvmnumlines;$m++) {
    $displaynum = $m + 1;
    echo "$displaynum. $kvmnamestrarr[$m] $kvmipstrarr[$m]\n";
}
 
echo "\n";
 
// use readline function to ask questions interactively
// trap function in a while condition for sanity checking on input until satisfied
$kvmanswer = "";
while (!$kvmanswer || ($kvmanswer>$displaynum) || !is_numeric($kvmanswer) ) {
    $kvmanswer = readline("Please choose a KVM guest (1-$displaynum): ");
}
 
echo "choice entered: $kvmanswer\n";
 
// because humans start at 1 and computers start at 0
$kvmchoiceminus = $kvmanswer - 1;
 
// we should not confuse kvm guest name with kvmadaptername
// we hardcode the name of the kvm adapter as the string "virbr0"
$kvmadaptername = "virbr0";
$kvmadapterip = $kvmipstrarr[$kvmchoiceminus];
 
echo "\n";
echo "kvmadaptername: $kvmadaptername\n";
echo "kvmadapterip: $kvmadapterip\n";
echo "\n";
 
// end ask client to choose KVM guest
// //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 
// start engine section
 
// construct the string variable containing the contents of the script file
 
$timestring = date("Y/m/d H:i:s T");
 
// start from nothing
$scriptcontents = "";
 
$scriptcontents .= "#!/usr/bin/bash\n";
$scriptcontents .= "# generated $timestring by forwardportstoguestgenerator.php v0102\n";
$scriptcontents .= "# Gordon Buchan https://gordonbuchan.com\n";
$scriptcontents .= "\n";
$scriptcontents .= "# values\n";
$scriptcontents .= "kvmsubnet=\"$kvmsubnet\"\n";
$scriptcontents .= "wanadaptername=\"$wanadaptername\"\n";
$scriptcontents .= "wanadapterip=\"$wanadapterip\"\n";
$scriptcontents .= "kvmadaptername=\"$kvmadaptername\"\n";
$scriptcontents .= "kvmadapterip=\"$kvmadapterip\"\n";
$scriptcontents .= "\n";
$scriptcontents .= "# allow virtual adapter to accept packets from outside the host\n";
$scriptcontents .= "iptables -I FORWARD -i \$wanadaptername -o \$kvmadaptername -d \$kvmsubnet -j ACCEPT\n";
$scriptcontents .= "iptables -I FORWARD -i \$kvmadapterip -o \$wanadaptername -s \$kvmsubnet -j ACCEPT\n";
$scriptcontents .= "# forward ports from host to guest\n";
$scriptcontents .= "iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -i \$wanadaptername -d \$wanadapterip -p tcp --dport 80 -j  DNAT --to-destination \$kvmadapterip:80\n";
$scriptcontents .= "iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -i \$wanadaptername -d \$wanadapterip -p tcp --dport 443 -j DNAT --to-destination \$kvmadapterip:443\n";
$scriptcontents .= "iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -i \$wanadaptername -d \$wanadapterip -p tcp --dport 8022 -j DNAT --to-destination \$kvmadapterip:22\n";
 
$scriptfilename = "forwardportstoguestscript.sh";
 
# write the text file
$fh = fopen("$scriptfilename","w");
$filesuccess = fwrite($fh,$scriptcontents);
fclose($fh);
 
if ($filesuccess) {
    echo "SUCCESS script written to file: $scriptfilename\n";
    chmod("$scriptfilename", 0755);
    $scriptperms = substr(sprintf('%o', fileperms("$scriptfilename")), -4);
    echo "scriptperms: $scriptperms\n";
    if ($scriptperms == "0755") {
        echo "SUCCESS chmod 755 $scriptfilename successful.\n";
    } else {
        echo "ERROR chmod 755 not $scriptfilename not successful.\n";
    }
} else {
    echo "ERROR script not written to file: $scriptfilename\n";
}
 
// end engine section
// /////////////////////

Saving the PHP script to a file called forwardportstoguestgenerator.php

Download this zip file:

https://blog.gordonbuchan.com/files/forwardtoguest0102.zip

Uncompress the zip file to extract the file “forwardportstoguestgenerator.php” then copy the file to your KVM host computer.

or

Select and copy the text from the source code example above, and paste the text into a file on your computer called “forwardportstoguestgenerator.php”

Executing as root

If you have not logged in as root, please escalate to root.

Enter this command:

sudo su

Installing php cli and net-tools

The PHP script requires the php cli and the ifconfig command from net-tools. The script also requires virsh, but you likely have that tool installed already if you are hosting KVM guests.

Ubuntu

Enter the command:

apt install php7.4-cli net-tools

Fedora

Enter the command:

dnf install php-cli net-tools

Executing the PHP script forwardportstoguestgenerator.php to generate the BASH script forwardportstoguestscript.sh

Enter the command:

php forwardportstoguestgenerator.php

When prompted, choose a WAN adapter and a KVM guest.

You will see output similar to the following:

root@server:/usr/bin# php forwardportstoguestgenerator.php
KVM subnet
kvmsubnet: 192.168.122.0/24
WAN adapters
1. enx4ce1734b693e 192.168.46.123
2. wlp0s20f3 192.168.46.103
Please choose a WAN adapter (1-2): 1
choice entered: 1
wanadaptername: enx4ce1734b693e
wanadapterip: 192.168.46.123
KVM guests
(hint: if a VM is not listed here, start the VM so it gets a DHCP lease)
1. midland 192.168.122.174
Please choose a KVM guest (1-1): 1
choice entered: 1
kvmadaptername: virbr0
kvmadapterip: 192.168.122.174
SUCCESS script written to file: forwardportstoguestscript.sh
scriptperms: 0755
SUCCESS chmod 755 forwardportstoguestscript.sh successful.

Executing the BASH script forwardportstoguestscript.sh

Enter the command:

bash forwardportstoguestscript.sh

Testing the forwarded ports

Using a different workstation on the network, connect to the IP address of the computer hosting the KVM guest.

If you have forwarded the public-facing ports on your router to the IP address of the computer hosting the KVM guest, test whether traffic on the ports is forwarded to the KVM guest.

Web presence step by step Chapter 12: Installing and configuring the WooCommerce plugin for WordPress to enable a shopping cart for transactions

Previous step: Chapter 11: Installing and configuring the WP Mail SMTP plugin for WordPress to enable WordPress to send email messages
Next step: Chapter 13: Installing and configuring MyBB to create a community forum site

Web presence step by step is a series of posts that show you to how to build a web presence.

In this chapter, we install and configure the WooCommerce plugin for WordPress to enable a shopping cart for transactions.

Accessing the WordPress control panel

Visit the URL for your WordPress control panel by entering your domain name followed by “/wp-admin” as in this example:

https://linuxstepbystep.com/wp-admin

Enter the username and password you specified when you created the WordPress blog in Chapter 8: Installing and configuring WordPress to create a website. Click “Log in”:

Installing the plugin

Click “Plugins”:

Click “Add New”:

search for the text “woocommerce”:

Click “Install Now”:

Click “Activate”:

Complete the fields “Address,” “Country/Region,” “City,” “Post code,” Click “Continue”:

Click “No thanks”:

Check boxes that apply to your situation. Click “Continue”:

For now, we will limit ourselves to the free tier of services, “Physical products” and “Downloads.” Avoid checking the remaining boxes until you become more expert, as these additional options incur a monthly or annual cost cost. Click “Continue”:

Select answers to the questions. Click “Continue”:

For now, we will de-select the additional services. Click “Continue”:

Click “Continue with my active theme”:

Click “No thanks”:

Click “Next”:

Click “Next”:

Click “Let’s go”:

Configuring WooCommerce

The WooCommerce plugin page appears. The “Finish setup” wizard is displayed. Explore the wizard by completing the steps. We will not explore this wizard in detail as it is largely self-explanatory, and there are many permutations of possible choices specific to each business case.

Avoid “Set up payments” until you have learned more

Delay configuring payments for your store until the end. You should feel comfortable experimenting with the software before there are live financial consequences due to a link with a payment service.

Avoid Jetpack and WooCommerce Tax, set up taxes manually

In the “Set up tax” section, avoid the option “Install Jetpack and WooCommerce Tax,” and instead select the option “Set up manually.”

Start by setting tax rates manually. If you decide later that you need the functionality in the “Jetpack” and “WooCommerce Tax” tools, you can install them later.

Previous step: Chapter 11: Installing and configuring the WP Mail SMTP plugin for WordPress to enable WordPress to send email messages
Next step: Chapter 13: Installing and configuring MyBB to create a community forum site

Web presence step by step Chapter 11: Installing and configuring the WP Mail SMTP plugin for WordPress to enable WordPress to send email messages

Previous step: Chapter 10: Integrating Google Site Kit with WordPress to view Google Analytics and Google Search Console visitor statistics
Next step: Chapter 12: Installing and configuring the WooCommerce plugin for WordPress to enable a shopping cart for transactions

Web presence step by step is a series of posts that show you to how to build a web presence.

In this chapter, we install and configure the WP Mail SMTP plugin for WordPress to enable WordPress to send email messages.

WordPress needs to be able to send emails

Some operations require that the WordPress software be able to send email messages. We need to choose or create a Gmail account from which messages will be sent. We need to configure that Gmail account with a web application and OAUTH2 authentication tokens. We need to install and configure the WP Mail SMTP plugin with information from the Gmail account.

Choosing or creating a Gmail account from which to send email messages

Choose an existing Gmail account, or create a new Gmail account. This account should not be the same email account you use for some other purpose, such as employee email. This Gmail account will be used by the WP Mail SMTP plugin for WordPress to send email messages. Login to this Gmail account.

Creating a web application and OAUTH2 authentication tokens

Visit this website:

https://console.developers.google.com/flows/enableapi?apiid=gmail&pli=1

Check the box for “I agree to the Google Cloud Platform Terms of Service…”
Select Country
“I would like to receive periodic emails…” Select “No”
Click “Agree and continue”:

Click “Go to credentials”:

Which API are you using?
Gmail API

Which data will you be accessing?
Web server (e.g. node.js, Tomcat)

Click “What credentials do I need?”:

Click “Set up consent screen”:

User Type
Select “External”

Click “Create”:

Complete the fields as shown below (use your domain instead of the example domain)

Click “Save and continue”:

Click “Add users”:

Enter an email address. Click “Add”:

Click “Save and continue”:

You will see a screen similar to the following. Note that we are on the right tab. Click on the left tab:

Enter values for “Name,” “Authorized JavaScript engine.”

For the field “Authorized redirect URIs,” enter this value:

https://connect.wpmailsmtp.com/google/

Click “Refresh”:

Click “OAuth client ID”:

Click “Done”:

You will see a screen similar to the following:

Installing and Configuring the WP Mail SMTP plugin for WordPress

Go to the control panel for your WordPress blog software. Go to Plugins. Search for “smtp.” Click on the “Install Now” button next to “WP Mail SMTP by WPForms”:

Click “Activate”:

Select “Gmail”:

Enter the values for “Client ID” and “Client Secret” you obtained from the Gmail control panels earlier in this procedure. Enter this value for “Authorized redirect URI”:

https://connect.wpmailsmtp.com/google/

Click “Save Settings”:

Click “Allow plugin to send emails using your Google account”:

Select the Gmail account you chose to allow the WP SMTP Mail plugin for WordPress to send email messages:

Click “Continue”:

Click “Allow”:

Click “Allow”:

Sending a test message

Enter an email address. Click “Send Email”:

An email similar to the following should arrive in the test destination mailbox:

Previous step: Chapter 10: Integrating Google Site Kit with WordPress to view Google Analytics and Google Search Console visitor statistics
Next step: Chapter 12: Installing and configuring the WooCommerce plugin for WordPress to enable a shopping cart for transactions

Web presence step by step Chapter 10: Integrating Google Site Kit with WordPress to view Google Analytics and Google Search Console visitor statistics

Previous step: Chapter 9: Installing and configuring phpMyAdmin to manage MySQL databases
Next step: Chapter 11: Installing and configuring the WP Mail SMTP plugin for WordPress to enable WordPress to send email messages

Web presence step by step is a series of posts that show you to how to build a web presence.

In this post, we install and configure the Google Site Kit plugin for WordPress in order to access Google Analytics and Google Search Console website statistics.

Understanding the link between WordPress, the Google Site Kit plugin, Google Analytics, and Google Search Console

In order to track visitor statistics for your website, Google Analytics needs a tracking code inserted into each web page you host. Google Search Console requires that we prove we have the authorization of the owner of the domain in order to view search engine statistics specific to the domain. By installing and configuring the Google Site Kit plugin for WordPress, we are able to add the necessary tracking code, and to prove to Google that we are the authorized owner of the domain name.

Creating or choosing a Gmail account for the connections to Google Analytics and Google Search Console

We will need a Gmail account to control the Google Analytics and Google Search Console transactions for your website. This account may have to be shared with marketing consultants and sales personnel, so it should not be associated with the email for a specific employee. The Gmail account can be a personal (free) Gmail account.

Logging out of Gmail, just to be sure

Before we begin, sign out of Gmail:

Logging into the Gmail account you created for Google Analytics and Google Search Console

Login to the account you created for use with Google Analytics and Google Search Console:

Enter the password for the account:

Gmail appears, logged into the account you created to manage Google Analytics and Google Search Console transactions:

Configuring Google Analytics to create a property

Visit the Google Analytics site. Click “Start measuring”:

Enter a value for “Account name,” check the boxes under “Account Data Sharing Settings.” Click “Next”:

Enter a value for “Property name.” Click “Next”:

Check a box for “Business size.” Check boxes as applicable under “How do you intend to use Google Analytics with your business (Check all that apply).” Click “Create”:

Check the boxes to accept the terms, click “I Accept” (if you want to):

Do not check any of these boxes. Click “Save”:

The Google Analytics site appears:

Installing the Google Site kit plugin for WordPress

Go to the control panel for your WordPress blog. Go to Plugins. Click “Add New.” Search for:

“analytics”

Locate “Site Kit by Google — Analytics, Search Console, AdSense, Speed.” Click on the button “Install Now” for the plugin:

Click “Activate”:

Click “Start setup”:

Click “Sign in with Google”:

Select the account you created to control Google Analytics and Google Search Console transactions for your domain:

Click “Allow”:

Click “Allow”:

Click “Allow”:

Click “Proceed”:

Click “Allow”:

Click “Add site”:

Click “Go to my Dashboard”:

The Google Site Kit plugin for WordPress Dashboard appears. In the box for “Analytics,” click on “Connect service”:

Select the Gmail account you created to control Google Analytics and Google Search Console Transactions for your website:

Click “Allow”:

Click “Allow”:

Select Account, Property. Provide a value for “View Name.” Click “Proceed”:

Select the Gmail account you created to control the Google Analytics and Google Search Console transactions for your domain:

Click “Allow”:

Click “Allow”:

The Google Site Kit plugin for WordPress Dashboard appears. Note that both “Search Console” and “Analytics” are now shown as “Connected”:

Wait a few days, then come back. There will be data then.

An example of what to expect:

Previous step: Chapter 9: Installing and configuring phpMyAdmin to manage MySQL databases
Next step: Chapter 11: Installing and configuring the WP Mail SMTP plugin for WordPress to enable WordPress to send email messages

Web presence step by step Chapter 9: Installing and configuring phpMyAdmin to manage MySQL databases

Previous step: Chapter 8: Installing and configuring WordPress to create a website
Next step: Chapter 10: Integrating Google Site Kit with WordPress to view Google Analytics and Google Search Console visitor statistics

Web presence step by step is a series of posts that show you to how to build a web presence.

In this post, we install and configure phpMyAdmin to manage MySQL databases.

This post assumes that you have performed the steps described in Chapter 8: Installing and configuring WordPress to create a website.

A note re MySQL and MariaDB

A few years ago, the company that owned MySQL was purchased by Oracle. The open source code was legally “forked” into a project called MariaDB. When this document refers to “MySQL,” it is actually referring to the MariaDB descendant of the MySQL database engine, made possible by the terms of the GPLv2 open source software license. Notice that to maintain compatibility with existing software, the command to invoke MariaDB on the command line is “mysql.”

Installing the php-xml and php-mbstring libraries

Use an SSH terminal program to connect to the Ubuntu Linux cloud server you created in Chapter 3: Buying an Ubuntu Linux cloud server from Digital Ocean. Enter the commands:

apt install php-xml php-mbstring
systemctl restart apache2

Generating a blowfish secret passphrase (blowfish_secret)

phpMyAdmin uses an encryption cipher called “blowfish.” We need to generate a blowfish secret passphrase to customize the phpMyAdmin config.inc.php configuration file.

Use a web browser to visit the site:

https://phpsolved.com/phpmyadmin-blowfish-secret-generator/?g=[insert_php]echo%20$code;[/insert_php]

Select the text in the line under “to,” right-click (or command-click on MacOS), then select “Copy”:

Keep this web browser window open. You will need to copy the text in the line above to the clipboard then paste it into the config.inc.php file in one of the steps below.

Downloading the phpMyAdmin zip file

Use a web browser to visit the site:

https://www.phpmyadmin.net/

Click on the link “Download x.x.x” (where “x.x.x” represents the current version number):

Extracting the phpMyAdmin zip file

(Reminder: there are detailed examples in Chapter 8: Installing and configuring WordPress to create a website that show how to extract the contents of a zip file for each operating system.)

Go to the file manager for your operating system (Windows File Explorer, MacOS Finder, Linux Nautilus).

Windows

In File Explorer, right-click on the phpMyAdmin zip file. Select “Extract All.” In the next dialog, click “Extract.”

MacOS

If you downloaded the phpMyAdmin zip file with Safari

if you downloaded the phpMyAdmin zip file with Safari, the zip file’s contents will be already be extracted as a directory in the Downloads directory.

If you downloaded the phpMyAdmin zip file with Chrome

In Finder, go to the Downloads directory. Double-click on the phpMyAdmin zip file. The Archive Manager will extract the contents of the phpMyAdmin zip file to a directory in the Downloads directory.

Linux

In Nautilus, go to the Downloads directory. Right-click on the phpMyAdmin zip file. Select “Open with Archive Manager.” In Archive Manager, click on “Extract.” In the next dialog, click on “Extract.”

Renaming the phpMyAdmin-x-x-x-x directory, renaming and editing the config.inc.php configuration file

Windows

Use File Explorer. Locate the phpMyAdmin directory nested within a directory of the same name). Right-click on the directory. Select “Rename”:

enter the text “phpmyadmin”:

Locate the file “config.sample.inc.php” file. Right-click on the file. Select “Rename”:

Enter the text “config.inc.php”:

Right-click on the file “config.inc.php,” select “Open with…”:

Select the “Notepad” application. Check the box “Always use this app to open .php files.” Click OK:

Paste the blowfish secret string you obtained earlier in the step “Generating a blowfish secret passphrase (blowfish_secret)” into the $cfg[‘blowfish_secret’] string assignment. Be careful to place single quotes (‘) before and after the blowfish_secret string:

MacOS

In Finder, locate the phpMyAdmin directory. Command-click on the directory. Select “Rename”:

Enter the text “phpmyadmin”:

Locate the “config.sample.inc.php” file. Command-click on the file. Select “Rename”:

Enter the text “config.inc.php”:

Command-click on the file. Select “Always Open With,” select “TextEdit”:

Paste the blowfish secret string you obtained earlier in the step “Generating a blowfish secret passphrase (blowfish_secret)” into the $cfg[‘blowfish_secret’] string assignment. Be careful to place single quotes (‘) before and after the blowfish_secret string:

Linux

In Nautilus, locate the phpMyAdmin directory. Right-click on the directory. Select “Rename”:

Enter the text “phpmyadmin”:

Locate the “config.sample.inc.php” file. Right-click on the file. Select “Rename”:

Enter the text “config.inc.php”:

Right-click on the file. Select “Open With Other Application”:

Click on “View All Applications”:

Select “Text Editor.” Click on “Select”:

Paste the blowfish secret string you obtained earlier in the step “Generating a blowfish secret passphrase (blowfish_secret)” into the $cfg[‘blowfish_secret’] string assignment. Be careful to place single quotes (‘) before and after the blowfish_secret string:

A note about the example domain and a reminder that you should use your domain name in its place

For clarity and narrative flow we are using the example domain linuxstepbystep.com but you should substitute your domain name as appropriate.

Uploading the “phpmyadmin” directory to the Ubuntu Linux cloud server

Use the FileZilla file transfer program to connect to the Ubuntu Linux cloud server you created in Chapter 3: Buying an Ubuntu Linux cloud server from Digital Ocean. In the left (local) panel, locate the local phpmyadmin directory. Right-click (for MacOS, command-click) on the directory and select “Upload”:

Wait for the file transfer to complete:

Accessing the phpMyAdmin application using a web browser

Use a web browser to visit your domain name followed by “/phpmyadmin”:

https://linuxstepbystep.com/phpmyadmin

(These are the MySQL username and password that were created in Chapter 8: Installing and configuring WordPress to create a website: “Creating the MySQL database for the WordPress site.”)

Enter values for the “Username:” and “Password:” fields. Click on “Go”:

This screen appears. Click on the name of the database in the left panel:

Click on a table in the left panel:

Table view:

Previous step: Chapter 8: Installing and configuring WordPress to create a website
Next step: Chapter 10: Integrating Google Site Kit with WordPress to view Google Analytics and Google Search Console visitor statistics

Web presence step by step Chapter 8: Installing and configuring WordPress to create a website

Previous step: Chapter 7: Configuring the SSH server on an Ubuntu Linux cloud server to limit SFTP directory visibility within chroot jail directories
Next step: Chapter 9: Installing and configuring phpMyAdmin to manage MySQL databases

Web presence step by step is a series of posts that show you to how to build a web presence.

In this post, we install and configure WordPress to create a website.

This post assumes that you have performed the steps described in Chapter 7: Configuring the SSH server on an Ubuntu Linux cloud server to limit SFTP directory visibility within chroot jail directories.

A note re MySQL and MariaDB

A few years ago, the company that owned MySQL was purchased by Oracle. The open source code was legally “forked” into a project called MariaDB. When this document refers to “MySQL,” it is actually referring to the MariaDB descendant of the MySQL database engine, made possible by the terms of the GPLv2 open source software license. Notice that to maintain compatibility with existing software, the command to invoke MariaDB on the command line is “mysql.”

Creating the MySQL database for the WordPress site

Use an SSH terminal program to connect to the Ubuntu Linux cloud server you created in Chapter 3: Buying an Ubuntu Linux cloud server from Digital Ocean.

Enter the command:

mysql -u root -p

Enter the commands (choose a password in place of “xxxxxx”):

create user blog01@localhost;
set password for blog01@localhost = 'xxxxxx';
create database blog01;
use blog01;
grant all privileges on * to blog01@localhost;
quit

Downloading the WordPress zip file using Chrome on Windows, MacOS, and Linux

Use the Chrome web browser to visit the following site:

https://wordpress.org/download/#download-install

Click on “Download WordPress 5.7” (the version number may have changed by the time you read this):

The zip file will download to your computer:

Right-click on the icon representing the zip file in the lower-left corner of the browser. Click “Show in folder”:

Downloading the WordPress zip file using Safari on MacOS

(note the zip file’s contents will be extracted automatically by Safari after the download completes)

Use the Safari web browser to visit the following site:

https://wordpress.org/download/#download-install

Click on “Download WordPress 5.7” (the version number may have changed by the time you read this):

Click “Allow”:

Click on the download icon in the lower-right of the screen. Select “Open in Finder”:

Extracting the contents of the WordPress zip file using Windows

Go to the Downloads folder. Right-click on the WordPress zip file. Select “Extract All”:

This dialog will appear. Click “Extract”:

A dialog shows the progress in extraction of the zip file’s contents:

The extracted contents of the zip file will appear as a directory named “wordpress-xxx” (“xxx” representing the version number), within which will be a directory called “wordpress”:

Extracting the contents of the WordPress zip file using MacOS

If you downloaded the zip file with Chrome on MacOS

Double-click on the WordPress zip file:

The MacOS archive manager will extract the zip file:

If you downloaded the zip file using Safari on MacOS

Note that Safari has extracted the contents of the WordPress zip file:

Extracting the WordPress zip file using Linux

Right-click on the WordPress zip file. Select “Open with Archive Manager”:

Right-click on the “wordpress” folder within the Archive Manager. Select “Extract”:

Click on “Extract”:

The following dialog appears:

A note about the example domain and a reminder that you should use your domain name in its place

Note: for clarity and narrative flow we are using the example domain linuxstepbystep.com but you should substitute your domain name as appropriate.

Using FileZilla to transfer the WordPress files to the Ubuntu Linux cloud server

Run the FileZilla file transfer program. Enter the following information the following fields:

Host: linuxstepbystep.com
Username: linuxstepbystep_com
Password: xxxxxx (where “xxxxxx” is the password for the linuxstepbystep_com account)
Port: 22

Click “Quickconnect”:

After connecting, you will see the contents of the server account in the right pane:

In the left pane, select the directory called “wordpress”:

In the right pane, select the directory “linuxstepbystep.com”:

In the right pane, right-click on the “index.php” file. Select “Rename,” enter the value “index.old.php”:

In the left pane, select the directory that contains the contents of the WordPress zip file:

In the left pane, select all of the files and directories:

Right-click on the selected files and folders. Select “Upload”:

Observe the progress of the file transfer in the lower window of the FileZilla file transfer program:

After the file transfer completes:

Configuring WordPress using the web installation wizard

Use a web browser to visit your domain name:

Select a language. Click “Continue”:

Click “Let’s go!”:

Complete the fields for “Database Name,” “Username,” “Password,” “Database Host.” Leave “Table Prefix” unchanged. Click “Submit”:

Click “Run the installation”:

Complete the fields for “Site Title,” “Username,” “Password,” “Your Email.” Do not check the box “Discourage search engines from indexing this file.” Click “Install WordPress”:

Click “Log In”:

The control panel for the WordPress blog software appears.

Note: this control panel can be reached by enterning your domain name followed by “/wp-admin”:

https://linuxstepbystep.com/wp-admin

Enter the username and password you selected earlier in the WordPress setup wizard. Click “Log in”:

The control panel for the WordPress blog software that enables your website:

Use a web browser to visit your domain name. You should see the default WordPress page:

Previous step: Chapter 7: Configuring the SSH server on an Ubuntu Linux cloud server to limit SFTP directory visibility within chroot jail directories
Next step: Chapter 9: Installing and configuring phpMyAdmin to manage MySQL databases

Web presence step by step Chapter 7: Configuring the SSH server on an Ubuntu Linux cloud server to limit SFTP directory visibility within chroot jail directories

Previous step: Chapter 6: Configuring an Ubuntu Linux cloud server to create a Linux Apache MySQL PHP (LAMP) web server, Part 2
Next step: Chapter 8: Installing and configuring WordPress to create a website

Web presence step by step is a series of posts that show you to how to build a web presence.

In this post, we configure the SSH server on an Ubuntu Linux cloud server to limit SFTP directory visibility within chroot jail directories.

This post assumes that you have performed the steps described in Chapter 6: Configuring an Ubuntu Linux cloud server to create a Linux Apache MySQL PHP (LAMP) web server, Part 2.

Why would you want to limit a user to a chroot jail directory?

A web server can host multiple websites. You may want to give to a web contractor SFTP access for one of the websites hosted on the server, but also prevent that web contractor from viewing or modifying other files or directories on the server unrelated to the website.

We will configure the SSH server to limit each SFTP user to only be able to view or modify a specific directory and its subdirectories. The formal term for this kind of directory is “chroot,” short for “change root directory.”

In the preceding chapter, we created the usernames, specified their home directories, and specified the directory locations for websites. The directory structure, ownerships, and permissions we applied to each directory anticipated that the directories would later be configured as chroot jail directories.

A user cannot own its own home directory

A user cannot own its own home directory. A user can own a subdirectory within its home directory.

Using the Digital Ocean cloud server web console instead of an SSH terminal program to connect to the cloud server

Normally, we interact with the Ubuntu Linux cloud server hosted at Digital Ocean by connecting with an SSH terminal program. However, since we are modifying the configuration of the SSH server itself, there is a chance we could break the SSH server and lock ourselves out. The Digital Ocean cloud server console provides terminal access to the Ubuntu Linux cloud server. We will use this console to modify the SSH server to implement chroot jail directories for each user.

Connect to the Digital Ocean site and login. Click on the Droplet you created in Chapter 3: Buying an Ubuntu Linux cloud server from Digital Ocean:

Click on “Console”:

Login to the cloud server. Enter the commands:

cd /etc/ssh
cp sshd_config sshd_config.factory
nano sshd_config

This is what it looks like when you load the file in the nano editor:

A note about the example domain and a reminder that you should use your domain name in its place

Note: for clarity and narrative flow we are using the example domain linuxstepbystep.com but you should substitute your domain name as appropriate.

Go to the bottom of the file, and add the following blocks of text:

Match User comingsoon
        ChrootDirectory /usr/web/comingsoon
        X11Forwarding no
        AllowTcpForwarding no
        ForceCommand internal-sftp
Match User linuxstepbystep_com
        ChrootDirectory /usr/web/linuxstepbystep_com
        X11Forwarding no
        AllowTcpForwarding no
        ForceCommand internal-sftp

Enter the command:

systemctl restart sshd

Obtaining the FileZilla file transfer program

Windows (client)

Warning re default “Download FileZilla” Client link for FileZilla for Windows

When downloading the Windows client from the FileZilla site, avoid the default “Download FileZilla Client” link, as it contains adware. Instead, click on the link “Show additional download options.” this is accessible via the following direct link. From this link, choose the option for “Windows 64bit x86”:

https://filezilla-project.org/download.php?show_all=1

MaOS (client)

From this link, choose the option for “MacOS X”:

https://filezilla-project.org/download.php?show_all=1

Ubuntu Linux (client)

If you are using Ubuntu Linux, you can install the FileZilla file transfer program with the command:

apt install filezilla

Fedora Linux (client)

If you are using Fedora or a related Red Hat system, you can install the FileZilla file transfer program with the command:

dnf install filezilla

Using the FileZilla file transfer program to connect to the cloud server

Complete the following fields. Click “Quickconnect”:

Host: your domain name
Username: linuxstepbystep_com
Password: (password)
Port: 22

Check the box “Always trust this host, add this key to the cache.” Click “OK”:

Note that the SFTP user is now limited to seeing the contents of its own directory. This means that if you have multiple websites on a server, the SFTP accounts that maintain those websites will not be able to view files or directories belonging to other websites or functions of the server:

Enter the subdirectory on the server to see the files and directories for the website:

Previous step: Chapter 6: Configuring an Ubuntu Linux cloud server to create a Linux Apache MySQL PHP (LAMP) web server, Part 2
Next step: Chapter 8: Installing and configuring WordPress to create a website